Alexander Simpson (countertenor) is an avid interpreter of J.S. Bach and is a scholar and soloist of the Royal Academy of Music/Kohn Foundation Bach series.  He has worked with leading experts including Ton Koopman, Iain Leddingham, Rachel Podger, Margaret Faultless and Terence Charlston and has performed as soloist in the St John and St Matthew Passions, the Christmas Oratorio, the Easter Oratorio, the Ascension Oratorio and many cantatas, including BWV 170, 82, 54, 53 and 169. He was the winner of the Rosenblatt Recitals Singing Prize and a Finalist and Runner-up in the London Bach Society Bach Singers Prize 2017. On the concert platform Alexander has performed at such concert venues as the Cadogan Hall, the Royal Festival Hall, the Concertgebouw and Tokyo’s Suntory Hall.  
 
As well as the staple countertenor repertoire, Alexander has performed music by Berlioz, Gounod and Delibes and is keen to promote Mozart‘s early operas. He is currently working toward a performance of Schubert’s Winterreise. He has been a recitalist in various venues including St George’s Hanover Square with Opera Lyrica, the Old Divinity School in Cambridge and at the Guild of Fishmongers. 
 
Recent operatic roles include Orlando in Handel's Orlando, Oberon in Britten’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, the Refugee in Jonathan Dove’s Flight and Eustazio in Handel’s Rinaldo for the Royal Academy of Music's Opera Scenes, Juno in Handel’s Semele (Cambridge University Opera Society) and Famigliaro (cover) in Monteverdi’s L’incoronazione di Poppea (Royal Academy Opera).  
 
Previously he read Music at St John’s College, Cambridge. Here he was a choral scholar under Andrew Nethsingha, where he featured as a soloist on BBC Radio 3. He was also a member of the Gentlemen of St John’s and features prominently as a soloist on their latest CD, Indulgence.  
 
Alexander graduated from the Royal Academy of Music with a DipRAM for an outstanding final recital and now studies on the Opera Course at the Royal Academy of Music with Michael Chance, Caitlin Hulcup and Ian Partridge. His studies are generously supported by the Violet Irene Strutton Award.